Posts Tagged ‘typography’

Mad Men S7E11: It’s Gonna Be Great

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Prints and more available through Society6. / Daily Drawing #1873. / Support this daily drawing project on Patreon!

Every week, Aaron Cohen (@UnlikelyWords) writes a recap of Mad Men for his blog Unlikely Words, and I illustrate something from the episode to go with it. Here’s Aaron’s recap for season 7 episode 11:

Episode title: “Time and Life.” (Time Life Building) I’m exhausted and this might be sloppier/less informative than usual.
Episode timing: No clue! When are applications due for Greenwich Country Day?

So, Lane Pryce (Jared Harris) directed this episode. I think this was his first. There were a few really great shots (Pete and Ken in the opening scene, Don, Roger, Ted, Joan having a drink in Don’s office, and the partners after the Hobart meeting.), but I don’t know if that was his doing.

Well, here we go again. The agency is changing! Ohnoes. It’s as if this hasn’t happened once a season since… I don’t know. The agency is getting adopted, absorbed, eaten, swallowed, dissolved by McCann Erickson. “They waited so long, I thought we were safe.” The Partners see this as a bad thing, McCann tries to spin it as something good. “I shouldn’t have to sell you on this. You are dying and going to advertising heaven.” I don’t know what to think! From Ted’s perspective, someone else will be in charge and he’ll be able to just work. Roger’s losing his agency and namesake, and Joan, as far as I can tell, is thinking only about that meeting from earlier in the season where Peggy and her were sexually harassed. “Need you to be the voice of the bright side.” “For the first time I feel like whatever happens is supposed to happen.” “They don’t know who they’re dealing with.” I’m not really sure what Don thinks except he generally does not work well with a boss so we can guess. It just feels redundant, this storyline, and I wish there could be some tension and something happen, without it being more agency upheaval.

(I think Harry Crane was somehow a partner at one of the previous agencies and decided not to sell or something, this makes me chuckle.)

The Partners come up with a plan to keep the agency together by moving to California with the conflicting accounts. “We’ve done this before.” They all feel pretty, pretty, pretty good about it, butttttt Hobart cuts them off and says they’re coming to McCann and that’s it. (“I shouldn’t have to sell you on this. You are dying and going to advertising heaven.” This was just one meeting in tonight’s episode that did not go as planned. Roger and Pete try to convince Ken to move with them. Pete and Trudi try to convince Greenwich Country Day to accept their daughter. (This was funny in that the headmaster kept giving different reasons why he wouldn’t accept her, but the real reason is a centuries-old feud between the Campbells and the McDonalds.) And The Partners telling the agency that they were being absorbed, and them being comically ignored. Basically, no one’s buying what they’re selling anymore. They’re out of touch, which is about the worst thing you can be as an advertising agency. It seems sudden for them to have lost it so quickly, maybe they’ll get it back at McCann.

The other seemingly big storyline was Peggy telling Stan about having a child. Pete sees a kid hug Peggy and gets a look. He remembers. I thought the baby was living with Peggy’s sister at one point, but that is hazy. “You do what you want with your children, I do what I want with mine.” “I don’t know, but it’s not because I don’t care. I don’t know, because you’re not supposed to know, or you can’t go on with your life.” “You don’t know lots of things about lots of people.” Peggy’s mad at that lady for yelling at her, but won’t let Stan judge her for the decisions she makes. It’s complicated and I guess I don’t have a ton to say about it.

I say it every other week, or maybe more, but I can’t get over the fact that the “Don Draper is really Dick Whitman, and shh, no one knows,” storyline isn’t a storyline anymore. There are subtle references every now and then, but it’s just not a source of tension anymore. Why?

Don and Roger messy at the bar was fun. Roger mentions how there will never be anymore Sterlings because his daughter is his only child, like he was. “No more Sterling Cooper, and no more Sterlings.” Obviously, the loss of the Sterling Cooper agency hurts for this reason. Don says something about aspiring to be like Shakespeare or something, and Roger says this drive is what he envies about Don. Don says he envied Roger not having to have this drive. Just a quick little scene about being born rich and born poor, I guess.

Lastly, if you’re still reading, when Don starts to tell The Partners about moving to the west coast, he shuts the curtains. Joan tells him to open them to keep the calm. This struck me as a nod toward transparency being the right way. I wonder if this is a recurring theme I haven’t noticed before, or if it’s a new theme to keep an eye on.

Last song: Money Burns a Hole in my Pocket by Dean Martin

Mad Men S7E10: The Plan is No Plan

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Prints and more available through Society6. / Daily Drawing #1868. / Support this daily drawing project on Patreon!

Every week, Aaron Cohen (@UnlikelyWords) writes a recap of Mad Men for his blog Unlikely Words, and I illustrate something from the episode to go with it. Here’s Aaron’s recap for season 7 episode 10:

Episode title: “The Forecast.”
Episode timing: I didn’t pick up on anything. Is this being left purposely vague? Presumably it’s sometime in May/June since Glen is finished with college and Sally is going on a trip?

In a shortened season, the mid-season malaise tends to happen at an accelerated pace. I don’t feel like much has happened last week or this week. Or, maybe stuff has happened, but not the kind of stuff I pick up on for these recaps. Hard to say!

In any case, this episode is all about the future, as made obvious by the episode title, “The Forecast.” Don’s task for the episode is writing a speech for Roger on what the future brings. He’s stumped and asks Ted Chaough, Peggy, Meredith, Sally… Anyone. “Let’s assume that it’s good, but it’s gonna get better. Supposed to get better.” After thinking about it for 15 minutes, let’s go out on a limb and say Don’s never looked to the future, never been able to, never had a reason to. At the same time, part of Don’s trouble “painting a picture” of the future is his dissatisfaction with his life/advertising. Don seems to be looking for something outside of advertising. More than advertising. He still doesn’t think what he does has much value. It’s why he responds to Ted (a pharmaceutical account) and Peggy’s (to create a catch phrase, something of lasting value) dreams the way he does. They’re valid, but because they’re based on goals in an advertising career, they’re cheap, or cheaper than real dreams. Which Don doesn’t have anyway, or can’t access.

Joan, on the other hand, dreams of charming Richard Burghoff / Bergoff. CHARMING with a capital MING. Joan is still a cool customer, much savvier than she comes off, but she still wants love. Richard wants her, but not to be saddled. “You’re such a disappointment.” “This is not how I saw things. I have a plan, which is no plans!” Joan remains frustrated by her son, “You’re ruining my life.” This felt like they were tying up Joan’s story, the way they tied up Megan last week. That said, I’m hoping for some Roger/Joan closure. “I don’t want to be rigid, it makes you old.”

Creepy Glen Bishop is back, baby, and there’s chest hair for everyone. He’s joining the army because he wants to impress Betty, or rather, he flunked out of college, and he thought if he joined the army, he could get with Betty. I’m half surprised Betty didn’t go for it. Didn’t she let him watch her pee before? Jeeze, Betty. You already said he’s “a fine young man.” “I feel safe because I know you’re mine.”

Don’s selling his house, which means… something. His real estate agent looks like Pete Campbell’s LA real estate girlfriend. She’s having trouble selling the empty shell of a condo because it reeks of failure, “It looks like a sad person lives here.” This seems a bit heavy handed, actually. Don sees the empty house and sees opportunity, thinks of all the stories you can tell with a blank slate. The real estate agent just sees it as a hard sell. Don’s “Sold a lot uglier things than this,” and, “That’s the best opportunity in the world.” Basically, Don’s an empty shell, just like his apartment. He’s always thought this was best (“opportunity”). Some people are beginning to point out that this chameleon act, empty shell lifestyle is not a good thing. In fact, it’s sad. Mathis and Sally both make this point explicitly during the episode, “Anyone pays attention to you, and they always do, you just ooze everywhere.” Come to think of it, I think this is what the episode is about, this is the big take away. “Don’t blame your failure on me” is what Don said to the real estate agent, but in other words to Mathis.

Sally and Betty seem to have made a certain kind of peace, “This conversation is a little late, and so am I,” “Everything’s a joke to you,” but it might just be her maturing and biding her time. A little birdie who I watch with every week thinks it’s interesting/good that Don’s relationship with Sally has been explored way more than his relationship with Bobby. Sally is an interesting character with depth, Bobby and Gene are just there. “You’re a very beautiful girl, it’s up to you to be more than that.” This is Don telling Sally that she can be like Betty, pretty and boring, or like him, pretty and successful. Right?

Miscellaneous
–Did you notice Don told Meredith he’d get the coffee himself so he could get two doughnuts and have an excuse to go into Ted’s office? I thought that was cute, but I don’t know why Don didn’t just ask Meredith to get him two doughnuts. Do you ever feel like there’s less to actually do, but more to think about?”

-Lou Avery is in California, still trying to sell his comic.

-When Sally’s friend was hitting on Don, he told Sally he didn’t want to embarrass her, but it seemed wildly out of character for him to go about it like that in front of Sally. He’s vain, but not THAT vain.

-Last song playing is The First Time I Ever Saw Your Face by Roberta Flack. Fitting.

Shred Your State

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For the past 5 weeks I’ve been teaming up with State Bicycle for some of my daily drawings. They’ve been posted by both myself and State. For each of these pieces I’ve been lettering over their photos. This is the last one of the series. Head over to the State Bicycle Co. Blog to read my guest post!

Prints and more available through Society6. / Daily Drawing #1864. / Support this daily drawing project on Patreon!

Mad Men S7E9: It’s a Sin to be a Ghoul

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Prints and more available through Society6. / Daily Drawing #1863. / Support this daily drawing project on Patreon!

Every week, Aaron Cohen (@UnlikelyWords) writes a recap of Mad Men for his blog Unlikely Words, and I illustrate something from the episode to go with it. Here’s Aaron’s recap for season 7 episode 9:

Episode title: “New Business.”
Episode timing: Megan mentions the 24th of the month, so maybe a couple months later? The only other reference I noticed was Diana seeming to have been away from New York for a while. I didn’t pick up anything hinting at the date.

My favorite part about this episode was when Diana said she had “a twinge in my chest,” and Don said, “a pain.” I was so excited because this a reference to the Carousel scene from the first season. “Teddy told me that in Greek, “nostalgia” literally means “the pain from an old wound.” It’s a twinge in your heart far more powerful than memory alone.” Diana continues to be a reference to all of Don’s women from the past. (To drive this point home, Diana is the goddess of the hunt, worked at a Greek diner, come on.)

I hope we see Diana again. She’s so interesting and sad, real. She tells Don she lost a daughter, and Don thinks she’s punishing herself. When it turns out she’s running away from another daughter, Don realizes… something. She’s a lot like him. Diana living in an empty room contrasts with Don’s now empty house. Diana is living in her pain, wallowing it, and while Don has certainly wallowed, he doesn’t seem to want to remember the pain regularly. Some lines, “Can’t you see I don’t want anything?” “You don’t think I’ve felt grief?” “I know you think you deserve this.” “When I was with you, I forgot about her. I don’t ever want to do that.” Don does want to forget and continues to chase women to be able to… This might be a dumb question, but what’s his main pain? The failure of his family? His childhood? Dick Whitman/Don Draper?

It’s definitely been a while since Don’s double life has been a part of the show, I wonder why. That said, “I know it’s not real, nothing about you is.” Megan wasn’t really talking about Dick Whitman, but maybe she said. “Aging, selfish, sloppy liar.” For the crowd that despises Don, that’s about what they think. “I’m vain.” Yep. Don and Sylvia and Diana and Arnold in the elevator. Yep. (Other people write about the doors/elevators. Check that stuff out sometime.)

Harry Crane is such a dick. When he goes in to tell Don he was going to have lunch with her, he looked disheveled, which had to be on purpose. Harry hits on her and Megan at least has enough self-respect to walk away from him. He’s such a weasel. “Oh, Harry.” With such contempt.

Megan’s mother, Marie, stealing everything from Don’s house was…funny. Marie was mad Megan had to pay for the move, and without changing her tone or skipping a beat, called Megan a whore for letting Don pay for it. And then she clears out the house. And then Megan took a million dollars from Don for the divorce. I don’t know if he had to do that, but she seemed to appreciate it. Now Don can start over fresh with no furniture. Then Roger has sex with Marie in Don’s place, which he knew he shouldn’t have done, but did anyway.

Marie “hates what he’s done to this family.” And she could have been talking about any of the families. This, combined with the reference to the Carousel scene makes me think the loss of Betty/Sally/Bobby/Gene, etc is the big loss. Who knows?

The last story line to discuss in the episode is Peggy and Pima and Stan. I know I shouldn’t still feel like this, but I want more than anything for this story line to lead to a return of Sal Romano. PLEASE. In any case, Pima, a fancy photographer swoops in and seduces Stan and tries to seduce Peggy. Not sure why she was trying to seduce both of them. Wouldn’t she have continued to get work with just Stan on board? Peggy either sees the truth of Pima, or gets Jealous of Stan. Either way, I don’t know what any of this means. “I can feel the tension of your need for my opinion.”

Miscellaneous!

-Betty was on the show for the first time, but I assume we’re not done with her. She’s going to get a masters in psychology because people, “Seek me out to share their confidences.” OK, Betty.

-NAC = “No afternoon calls.” Not bad.

-Don’s secretary references the Manson brothers leading to a funny exchange where Don asks if they’re coming in for meeting.

-Don and Pete have to go golfing with Burt Peterson. Don says he’ll roll up his sleeves and rent clubs. Remember when Burt Peterson got fired from one of the agencies 4 or 5 mergers ago? Pete’s hair is still receding (the actor shaves his hairline back, which is so ballsy) and seemingly asks Don for advice on how to be single.

-The last song: C’Est Si Bon by Yves Montand

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Who is this guy?

After starting his career as a graphic designer at award-winning studios in New England, Chris accidentally became an illustrator. He’s pretty happy about that. This strange transformation was a result of his daily drawing project that he started in late 2007, in fact he’s still posting a new drawing every day.  Chris holds degrees in Visual Communication Design and Art History from the Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford, where he is currently pursuing his Masters Degree in Illustration. He has been the recipient of Gold Awards, Silver Awards, Excellence Awards, Judge’s Awards and the Spirit of Creativity Award from the Connecticut Art Director’s Club as well as BoNE awards from the AIGA and a Silver Award from Gaphis. In addition his work has been published in numerous books and publications including Print Magazine and Communication Arts. His client list includes; Converse, Nike, Chronicle Publishing, Boston Magazine, McDonalds, Scholastic, Harvard Business School Publishing, Warner Music Group, Republic Records.

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