I’m so many people / Mad Men 7:2

1608-20140421-MadMen-ImSoManyPeople

Prints and more available at Society6! / Daily Drawing #1608. / 2014 Zine Subscriptions available!

Every week, Aaron Cohen (@UnlikelyWords) writes a recap of Mad Men for his blog Unlikely Words, and I illustrate something from the episode to go with it. Here’s Aaron’s recap for season 7 episode 2:

Episode Title: “A Day’s Work.” Off the top of my head, I can’t remember any episodes taking place all in one day. Or, almost a day. Pete, Bonnie, and Ted had a tryst late on the evening of the 13th.

Timing of the episode: February, 14 1969, only a few weeks from episode 1.

As well as Don looked to be doing last week, this week he was less put together: Unshowered, house a mess, marking off the liquor bottle with a grease pencil to keep track of his drinking. Don only cleans the house and gets dressed when Dawn comes to report on the goings on in the office. Obviously lonely, Don tries to charm Dawn into staying for coffee, but she demurs. When he offers her “car fare,” “There’s something about the money that makes it feel wrong.” THAT’S WHAT THE MONEY IS FOR.

Imagine now there are 400 words on the symbolism of Don seeing a cockroach in his apartment.

Pete also seemed better off last week than this week. Pete still only cares about closing the deal, which he should, because he is selling, but it leads to trouble for him every time. Last week, he was mooning about California’s vibrations, now he doesn’t know if he’s in “heaven or hell or limbo.” Ted remains placid, as ever, “Just cash the checks, you’re gonna die one day.” Pete’s girlfriend seems to know how it all works, “Our fortunes are in other people’s hands and we have to take them,” but I think Pete grew up holding the fortunes maybe?

Joan figured out her Dawn/Lou issue by making Dawn head of personnel, but what does this mean when Don comes back? Last year, there was a similar situation where Joan gave Dawn additional responsibility and intimated she’d need a willingness to be unliked. This came up again when Joan and Culter were discussing what was required of a head of personnel. Most people still want to see Mad Men tackle race, but I don’t think we’re ever going to get it.

When Dawn and Shirley were talking about Shirley’s flowers, they were calling each other each other’s names. Maybe they do that because that’s what happens in the office? Dawn gets called Shirley and vice versa? “Keep pretending, that’s your job.”

There were some interesting examples of embarrassment this week: Ted catching Pete and Bonnie, Sally finding Lou in Don’s office, Peggy thinking Shirley’s flowers were for Peggy, Sally catching Don in a lie, Don getting caught in a lie. Etc. Etc.

Peggy had a fun time today, alone again. “Enjoy your flowers, boss.” She knows she’s acting crazy, but she can’t help it. Ted has moved on from her, even if she doesn’t want to admit that. The scenes with Shirley’s flowers were gold, just gold. My favorite of this young season. Not sure what Ginsberg has against her, though. “February 14th: Masturbate gloomily.”

I can’t really understand why Roger had a problem with asking Detroit about the Chevy dealerships. I got to thinking it might have something to do with Don not being around (and Lou in his place, “Strangest things happen to you.”), but there’s not much evidence for that. He’s bored at SCP, that’s for sure. Also, anti-semitism is alive and well in 1969, NYC.

Racism, too. Thanks, Bert Cooper. He’s not saying Dawn shouldn’t be at the front desk, he’s just saying.

Sally is back, and I don’t remember her eyebrows being so eyebrowy. “I’d stay here until 1975 if I could get Betty in the ground.” Sally is the perfectly cynical boarding school teenager, a funeral is a good excuse for a shopping spree until losing her purse. Upon discovering Lou Avery in her dad’s office, she was upset, showing as much as she’s tried to grow up, she’s still a little girl. The wall comes up again upon catching Don in a lie. She wants to love her dad, but he makes it almost impossible. By insisting on trying to be the perfect man, Sally is repulsed and reminded of Don’s failings. What goes on the note? “Just tell the truth.” It’s only when he comes clean about being asked to leave SCP Sally warms to him again. “I told the truth about myself.” “Nothing you don’t already know.” While the Shirley/Peggy scenes were great, the Don/Sally scenes were probably the most important scenes so far. Don will continue wanting to treat Sally as a child, but as she says, “I’m so many people.” She’s got it tough.

This Will Be Our Year by The Zombies played out over the credits.

MH-cover
Mayer Hawthorne
RachelRay
Rachel Ray Magazine
PutnamCountySpellingBee
Red Mountain Theater
001-DIG-93-edit
DIG Magazine
20120430-chrispiascik-0147-final
Milltag Cycling Jersey

Recent Comments

INSTAGRAM

 

Archives

Who is this guy?

After starting his career as a graphic designer at award-winning studios in New England, Chris accidentally became an illustrator. He’s pretty happy about that. This strange transformation was a result of his daily drawing project that he started in late 2007, in fact he’s still posting a new drawing every day.  Chris holds degrees in Visual Communication Design and Art History from the Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford, where he is currently pursuing his Masters Degree in Illustration. He has been the recipient of Gold Awards, Silver Awards, Excellence Awards, Judge’s Awards and the Spirit of Creativity Award from the Connecticut Art Director’s Club as well as BoNE awards from the AIGA and a Silver Award from Gaphis. In addition his work has been published in numerous books and publications including Print Magazine and Communication Arts. His client list includes; Converse, Nike, Chronicle Publishing, Boston Magazine, McDonalds, Scholastic, Harvard Business School Publishing, Warner Music Group, Republic Records.

Represented in France by: Valérie Oualid

Check the full bio here.